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The Personalized Journal

Martin Fenner
February 10, 2012 0 min read

Earlier this week I wrote a guest post (https://web.archive.org/web/20161026234447/http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2012/02/09/more-tweets-more-citations/?) for the Impact of Social Sciences blog. In the post I talk about a recent paper correlating tweets and citations (also discussed on this blog (https://web.archive.org/web/20161026234447/http://blogs.plos.org/mfenner/2011/12/20/crowdometer-or-trying-to-understand-tweets-about-journal-papers/?)). But the main argument I try to make is that tweets are a powerful filter for personalized scholarly content:

A few years from now the “personalized journal” will have replaced the traditional journal as the primary means to discover new scholarly papers with impact to our work.
Carmeliet, P. (2005). Angiogenesis in life, disease and medicine. Nature, 438(7070), 932–936. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature04478
Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. G., Alexiou, G. A., Gouvias, T. C., & Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2008). Life Cycle of Translational Research for Medical Interventions. Science, 321(5894), 1298–1299. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1160622
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2005. (2015). In web.archive.org. https://web.archive.org/web/20150814032045/http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/2005/index.html

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